Open centered model best strategy for social change

There is a vast total-information-awareness surveillance network made up of global corporations and subservient (captured) governments engaging in the systematic infiltration and suppression of social justice activist groups. Their main method of control is the implementation of divide-and-conquer strategies.  When it comes to activists, their approach is to apply these strategies to what they have defined as four distinct groups: Radicals, who see the system as corrupt are marginalized and discredited with character assassination techniques.  Realists, who can be convinced that real change is not possible.  Idealists, who can be convinced (through propaganda) that they have the facts wrong.  And Opportunists, who are in it for themselves and therefore can be easily co-opted.   These suppression strategies, revealed on Stratfor documents from the WikiLeaks “Global Intelligence Files” (“as a result of Jeremy Hammond’s December 2011 hack”),  were reported in a MintPress News article written by Steve Horn: “How To Win The Media War Against Grassroots Activists: Stratfor’s Strategies

The anti-terrorist apparatus that the U.S. government established after 9/11 has now been turned against law-abiding citizens exercising their First Amendment rights. This apparatus consists not only of advanced surveillance technologies but also of “fusion centers” in state after state that coordinate the efforts of law enforcement up and down the line and collaborate with leading members of the private sector. Often, the work they do in the name of national security advances the interests of some of the largest corporations in America rather than focusing on protecting the United States from actual threats or attacks, such as the one at the Boston Marathon on April 15.

The emphasis is mine

How well-integrated is this coordination?  

There are two primary domestic public-private intelligence sharing partnerships at work at the federal level: Infragard and the Domestic Security Alliance Council (DSAC).

Infragard is a public-private intelligence sharing partnership managed by the FBI Cyber Division Public/Private Alliance Unit (PPAU). As described by the FBI, Infragard is an “association of businesses, academic institutions, state and local law enforcement agencies and other participants dedicated to sharing information and intelligence to prevent hostile acts against the United States.” There are 86 Infragard chapters nationwide. These Infragard chapters serve as representatives of private sector “stakeholders” in the many of the nation’s fusion centers.

DSAC is a public-private intelligence sharing partnership between the FBI, U.S. DHS I&A and several of the nation’s leading corporate/financial interests. Some of these corporate/financial interests comprise the DSAC Leadership Board. The DSAC Leadership Board consists of 29 corporations and banks, including several entities that have been the subject of OWS protests/criticism. Corporate/financial interests active in the DSAC Leadership Board include: Bank of America, MasterCard, Citigroup, American Express, Barclays, RBS Citizens, 3M, Archer Daniels Midland, ConocoPhillips, Time Warner and Wal-Mart. Along with DSAC chairmen from the FBI and U.S. DHS I&A, DSAC is co-chaired by a representative of these private sector interests– currently Grant Ashley, vice president of global security for pharmaceutical giant Merck & Co.

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/01/03/1266850/-An-Open-Letter-to-The-Occupy-Wall-Street-Movement-You-Were-Right-All-Along?detail=email

Epson Debuts Smart Glasses For Enterprise And Sports Stadium Fun

i wonder if this can replace my cellphone screen, and give me a way to control the sony wireless camera, i like this for mobile computing, photo tweaking, internetting!

TechCrunch

Epson is going after Google with its own heads-up display glasses. The Moverio BT-200 is a head-controlled device with a screen that overlays a transparent computer monitor in the center of the user’s field of vision. The clunky, conspicuous form factor is mainly designed for enterprises, such as allowing assembly line workers to scan UPC codes automatically and get real-time inventory by looking around the room.

Smart glass software developer APX, which originally designed the device’s Skylight operating system, is partnering with Epson for their projector manufacturing prowess. “These glasses are essentially two small LCD projectors,” says Anna Jen, Epson’s Director of New Ventures (demo below).

The device itself works smoothly. I demoed a gaming application, where I had to look around the room for virtual white “beacons”. To upgrade my video game motorcycle with turrets, I centered my field of vision over the white lights situated at eye level. It’s…

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A comic in France stirs a movement of outrage

Alain Soral is a French author and philosopher whose political career included a membership in the French Communist Party and the National Front.  He is credited with developing the concept of “gauche du travail – droite des valeurs” (literally “left of labor – right of values”) which can be summarized as the simultaneous advocacy of  socialist/social ideas and measures in economic and social issues combined with conservative moral, ethical and religious values in ideological, ethical and cultural issues.  He is the founder of an extremely interesting movement called “Egalite et Reconciliation” which aims at reconciling native French people (called “Francais de souche” or “root French”) with those French people who recently immigrated to France (called “Francais de branche” or “branch French”) and to make them co-exist in complete equality.  Because of his numerous “politically incorrect” ideas and very overt statements, Soral is absolutely hated and feared by the French ruling class.  Even though Soral has also been completely banned from any public media,  He remains immensely popular with the general public and his books are all best-sellers.

Soral and Dieudo are very different people, they have very different backgrounds and they have very different personalities.  There even used to be a time when they were sharply critical of each other.  But when the French elites decided to basically destroy them they became closer together and now they are good friends, and they openly support each other, as a result we have this truly bizarre phenomenon: a White philosopher and a Black comedian have jointly become a kind of “two-headed Emmanuel Goldstein” of modern France: the elites absolutely hate them and the media as gone into a completely Orwellian “two minute of hate” frenzy mode trying to convince the French people that Soral and/or Dieudo are almost a reincarnation of Adolf Hitler.  Needless to say, this thesis is so stupid that Dieudo makes fun of it in his shows while Soral ridicules it in his books and uses it to show that France is run by a tiny elite of vicious and arrogant SOBs.

In truth, one has to admit that the French elites are facing two formidable enemies.  Dieudonne is truly one of the most talented French comedian ever while Soral is without any doubt the most original and brilliant philosopher France has seen since WWII.  Furthermore, French law makes it rather difficult to completely ban a show or a book.  God knows, the French elites have tried, and both Dieudo and Soral have been taken to court numerous times for “racism” and “anti-Semitism”, both of them have been physically assaulted several times by the thugs of the “LDJ” (Jewish Defense League) and both of them are constantly harassed by the authorities (the French version of the IRS and the FBI).  Yet, this systematic campaign of persecutions has clearly backfired against its authors and given Dieudo and Soral a (well-deserved) martyr status.  Finally, Dieudo and Soral have shown that they are extremely sophisticated users of the Internet where their shows, special events, interviews, books, monthly news roundups have been extremely popular and are seen by many millions of people in France and abroad.

Gradually, Soral and Dieudo have built a real political movement which is active both on the internal front and on international issues.

As I mentioned, “Egalite et Reconciliation” or “E&R” stands for a full acceptance and integration of Muslim immigrants into the French society.  This is crucial because unlike the French National Front, E&R does not advocate the expulsion of immigrants out of France.  Not only that, but E&R even denies that immigrants are the real problem.  Of course, E&R does not deny that unemployment is huge in France, nor does it deny that a large percentage of crime and violence in France are committed by immigrants, but they see that as an effect of previous political mistakes and not as a cause of the problems of France.

http://vineyardsaker.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/is-new-revolution-quietly-brewing-in.html

Canadian Action Party Monetary Reform 1

The Bank of Canada, unlike the Federal Reserve in the U.S., is wholly owned by the people of Canada. It was nationalized in 1938 and was used very successfully to fund infrastructure, social programs, education, etc, for the benefit of all Canadians. It was used to bring us out of the depression, funded WWII, to build highways such as the McDonald-Cartier freeway, public transportation systems, subway lines, airports, the St. Lawrence Seaway, our universal healthcare system and our Canada Pension Plan.

Unfortunately, since Canada adopted economist Milton Friedman’s theory of monetarism in 1974 this has not been the case and one can track the progression of the dismantling of Canada since then.

By 1974, Canada’s accumulated federal debt since confederation was 18 billion. By 1977, after the government reduced its use of the Bank of Canada to carry public debt, it had risen 3000% to 588 billion. Today the debt is 500 billion, 95% which is compound interest owed to private banks and investors. Currently Canadian pay 37 billion approximately per year in debt servicing.

We must return to the Bank of Canada for a minimum of 50% of Government-created money (GCM). It is essential to maintaining our sovereignty (our monetary system must not be in the complete control of the private bankers and corporate elites. GCM could also be used to:

Incrementally repatriate our debt back to the Bank of Canada, eventually eliminating the need of paying interest to private banks. This means lower income taxes for all.
Fund new infrastructure (roads, bridges, hospitals, schools) could be built at a fraction of the cost because of reduced interest costs.
Lend to provinces and municipalities at near or zero interest with the proviso that they maintain a certain level and quality of healthcare, housing and education. That means lower property taxes for all.
Improve our universal health care system, reducing wait times and removing public-private partnerships. It is a proven fact that public healthcare systems are more efficient than private ones because profit is not the motive.
Ensure that our public school systems and teachers are equipped with all that is necessary to bring forth future generations of well informed, well-rounded, well-educated adults capable of critical thinking.
Lower and/or subsidize university tuitions so that all citizens would have an opportunity to attend institutions of higher learning should they wish, without ending up in the poor house.
Alleviate the suffering of the poor, homeless, drug-addicted and mentally challenged.
Invest in green technologies to save our environment.
Invest in the family farm and new agricultural technologies that would eventually benefit all citizens.

Therefore:

The Canadian Action Party would:

Ensure that a minimum of 50% of new money supply would be
GCM on which not interest is paid (an increase from less than 5% currently).
Amend the Bank Act requiring banks and other deposit taking institutions to maintain statutory cash reserves with the Bank of Canada.

pushinback

Canadian Action Party Monetary Reform – An Alternative to our Present Economic Debt System

Those who have followed my blogs know that I have criticized our Federal Government`s policy of borrowing money to enact the common affairs of the Canadian people. I would be remiss in merely criticizing our Government without giving an alternative vision of how our financial system could be done. Merely criticizing the Government without giving constructive alternatives have become the trademark of Opposition Parties. Opposition Parties are no alternatives to the Government because when they get their opportunity to govern they make the identical mistake that they criticize in the corrupt ruling party is making. The alternative is to try something entirely different in financial management. The Canadian Action Party has such a plan, which is why I have asked the Canadian Action Party if I could reprint the information on their website; to inform Canadians…

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The Question that Shouts Out from the Silence of the Page

Here is a chart from Statistics Canada. It represents Canada’s debt from the time of Confederation until 2008. As you can see, Canada’s debt lay flat many years and quite suddenly a curve developed and it seemed like the line was a jet and took off into the heavens. The peak was closing in on almost $700 Billion of debt. Today, Canada’s debt is about $630 Billion which represents a ball and chain of $17,500 for every man, woman and child. See Canada’s Debt Clock : http://www.debtclock.ca/

pushinback

aHere is a chart from Statistics Canada. It represents Canada’s debt from the time of Confederation until 2008. As you can see, Canada’s debt lay flat many years and quite suddenly a curve developed and it seemed like the line was a jet and took off into the heavens. The peak was closing in on almost $700 Billion of debt. Today, Canada’s debt is about $630 Billion which represents a ball and chain of $17,500 for every man, woman and child. See Canada’s Debt Clock : http://www.debtclock.ca/

It wasn’t always this way. Back in the midst of the Great Depression, the banks had called their loans, and at the same time the banks did not lend money out. This was the cause of the Depression; very little money in the economy.  So, the Canadian Government under Lyon MacKenzie King, bought a few banks and created the Bank…

View original post 1,058 more words

Five questions about the mysteriously rediscovered Senate emails

Five questions about the mysteriously rediscovered Senate emails.

OTTAWA – On May 20, CTV reported that Benjamin Perrin, a lawyer in the Prime Minister’s Office, “helped draft the letter of understanding” that called for Sen. Mike Duffy to pay his disputed expenses with $90,000 from then chief of staff Nigel Wright.

Perrin, who had left the PMO in April, issued a release the next day, stating that the report was “false.”

“I was not consulted on, and did not participate in, Nigel Wright’s decision to write a personal cheque to reimburse Senator Duffy’s expenses,” Perrin’s statement said.

An RCMP document recently said emails from Perrin had been deleted when he left the PMO last March.

But the revelation Sunday night that the government does in fact have Perrin’s emails has led to more questions in an affair that already has more than its fair share. 

Question 1: What’s in the emails?

Although Perrin said CTV’s report was false, the Information To Obtain (ITO) released in court by the RCMP suggests Perrin negotiated Wright’s arrangement with Duffy. Perrin exchanged an unknown number of emails with Duffy’s lawyer, Janice Payne.

The RCMP has described the contents of some of those exchanges, because Wright handed over the emails, but there are likely other emails on which Wright was not copied.

The RCMP has also asked Duffy for those emails, but it’s not clear whether he has them or whether they are still with Payne. Since he was Payne’s client, he can presumably demand them, but neither he nor Payne has said whether they intend to hand them over.

Question 2: How did the Prime Minister’s Office manage to lose track of Perrin’s emails?

In September, when RCMP Cpl. Greg Horton asked the PMO for Perrin’s emails, he was told they had been deleted.

“Internal practice within the PMO is that a person’s account and emails are removed from the computer server once their employment ends,” Horton wrote.

Last month, after Horton filed his ITO – which led to public speculation about email backups – the RCMP contacted the PMO to ask it to look for the emails again.

On Sunday evening, Isabelle Mondou, an assistant secretary to Cabinet, wrote to the RCMP to say that on Friday, officials discovered “that Mr. Perrin’s emails had in fact been retained due to a litigation hold in an unrelated matter.”

Mondou apologized for having “previously failed, even if inadvertently, to accurately inform you and the PMO,” and promised to hand over the emails.

On Twitter, Postmedia columnist Andrew Coyne expressed skepticism about the PMO’s story: “You don’t check? You don’t get that straight? You don’t nail that down? You don’t ask?”

In reply, Jason MacDonald, director of communications to Prime Minister Stephen Harper, replied: “We did ask. Repeatedly. PCO (Privy Council Office) said they were gone. Repeatedly. They were wrong. We told them to tell the RCMP. They’ve done that.”

Question 3: Does the government really delete email accounts when employees leave?

The letter from Mondou says that “the operating protocol of the PCO to close and delete email accounts of departing employees of the PCO and the PMO is a matter of course.”

On Nov. 22, in response to a question about the account-deletion policy, PCO spokesman Raymond Rivet provided links to federal policy documents that outline rules for dealing with documents, neither of which mention PCO’s “operating protocol.”

On Monday, Rivet failed to respond to follow up questions asking about that protocol, but Ian E. Wilson, who was chief Librarian and Archivist of Canada until 2009, said in an interview Monday that it seems unlikely that all PCO and PMO email accounts are routinely deleted.

“I think it has to be more complicated than that, as records created day by day in PMO in discussion and policy are of longterm importance to Canadians,” he said. “I find that wholesale deletion of email accounts – how do I put it? – seriously impact the historical record.”

The Library and Archives Act forbids officials from destroying records “without the written consent of the Librarian and Archivist or of a person to whom the Librarian and Archivist has, in writing, delegated the power to give such consents.”

Wilson said Parliament did not want officials routinely destroying documents.

Neither the Library and Archives nor PCO responded to queries on Monday about how they are complying with the act.

Question 4: Will Canadians ever know what’s in the Perrin emails?

The RCMP does not comment on ongoing investigations, and won’t release them unless they file charges or file them in court as part of a request for a search warrant or production order.

In Question Period on Monday, NDP Leader Tom Mulcair asked the government to table the emails in the House. The government did not do so.

Question 5: Is the RCMP releasing information to put pressure on PMO to release documents?

The most recent Information to Obtain – outlining the RCMP’s case against Wright – was made public before the documents it sought were handed to investigators, a departure from normal procedure, the Ottawa Citizen has reported.

The RCMP says that courthouse procedures have changed. The courthouse says that Horton took a new step to make the documents public, leading to speculation that the RCMP is using the ITO to pressure the PMO to co-operate.

An RCMP official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Monday that’s not correct.

“How should I put it?” the official said. “That makes for good copy, I’ll stop there. Do you think an organization like the RCMP would play those games?”

The official added that the way the RCMP is going about its investigation is being “rigorously” scrutinized. “It is by the book.”

On Monday, Perrin declined  comment about the emails to a Postmedia News reporter who visited his office. He now works at the University of British Columbia.

– With files from Douglas Quan, Postmedia News.

smaher@postmedia.com

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