Thoughts on the future of finance blogging | FT Alphaville

Thoughts on the future of finance blogging | FT Alphaville.

 

Which is why I think that the lack of expansion is permanent, and also why I wonder if other finance blogs will have to follow the rest of their newsrooms behind registration barriers and paywalls. (FT Alphaville recently moved behind a registration barrier, though it remains in front of the FT paywall.)

I don’t think that professional finance blogging will disappear, only that its population will remain static. Further expansion and dynamism in the finance blogosphere is more likely to be found in its non-professional domain.

——-

Luckily, that domain and the finance blogosphere as a whole is still an exciting and diverse place.*

Most people who follow finance blogs are already aware of those run on the side by finance professionals, sometimes pseudonymously – people such as The Epicurean Dealmaker, Economics of Contempt, Kid Dynamite, Josh Brown. Those are in addition to the finance bloggers who specialise in something highly specialised and unique; the accountancy blogs of Francine McKenna and Michelle Leder come to mind, as does the curation blog of Tadas Viskantas.

The academics, mainly economists, who blog on finance issues aren’t going anywhere. Some think tanks and policymaking institutions have also founded blogs, and plenty of excellent finance blogging will continue as part of more-generalist blogger teams that write about business and politics and economics.

But probably my favourite trend has been the sudden emergence by certain bloggers during the various episodes of the European financial crisis period, ascending instantly to prominence when their particular points of expertise became relevant.

The most recent example was Pawel Morski’s wonderful blogging on the Cyprus bailout. Before him came writers like Brian Lucey and Karl Whelan on Ireland, Yiannis Mouzakis on Greece, and Lorcan Roche Kelly on some of the weirder intricacies of the ECB.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s